Join Me on Sat., Aug. 17, 2019, for the Re-Opening of Irvine Lake!

Join me on Saturday, August 17, 2019, for the official re-opening celebration at Irvine Lake!

Irvine Lake, 700 acres in size, is one of the most beautiful and peaceful places in Orange County.

Formed by the Santiago Dam, built between 1929 and 1931, the lake was originally called the Santiago Reservoir. The dam was built by the Irvine Company and the Serrano Irrigation District (now called the Serrano Water District), and is now owned by both the Serrano Water District and the Irvine Ranch Water District and operated by Serrano Water District. The lake provides drinking water to Villa Park and some parts of Orange, and provides supplementary irrigation water to neighboring ranches. Stocked with largemouth bass, catfish, and trout, the lake opened to fishing by the public in 1941.

My family has wonderful memories of fishing on the lake.  In fact, my husband and I went fishing there on our first date in March 1994!

Fishing with my son Max at Irvine Lake in 2010.

Sadly, due to prolonged drought that drastically lowered water levels and inter-governmental conflicts between the County and the Water Districts, the lake was closed to the public and fenced off in 2011.

This week, Orange County Supervisor Don Wagner announced that the Irvine Company has deeded 29 acres of land adjacent to the lake to the County of Orange, and that an agreement has been reached among all the government entities involved to reopen the lake to the public for shoreline fishing.

The opening day event will include free breakfast, coffee and giveaways, and visitors can fish from the shore between 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

The public can access the lake during those same times every Friday through Sunday.

No fishing license will be required, but there will be a $5 parking fee. For now, no boats are allowed on the water.

The Longfin Fishing Tackle Store will be open.

Thank you to Supervisor Wagner and all the people who worked with the County, the Water Districts, and the Irvine Company to re-open Irvine Lake!

Irvine Lake is located at 4621 E. Santiago Canyon Road, Silverado, CA 92676

For more information, call 714-649-9111.

 

 

Irvine City Councilmember Melissa Fox Speaks at Ceremony Marking Project to Protect Newport Bay Watershed

As a member of the Newport Bay Watershed Executive Committee, as a representative of the City of Irvine, and as a life-long environmentalist, it was my pleasure to speak today at the ceremony marking the start of an extensive project to remove high levels of sediment from the Newport Bay Watershed.

The project, which will remove 172 thousand cubic yards of sediment, will protect many aquatic, wildlife, and rare and endangered species that habitat in Newport Bay, as well as protect the integrity of our flood channels.

Here is what I said:

“Prior to development, this section of the Irvine Ranch was mainly agricultural.

Geographically, Irvine is the largest city in Orange County and it has now grown to become the third largest by population after Anaheim and Santa Ana.

Our planning prioritizes smart, sustainable growth, particularly now, and we are a leader in low-impact development.

Our growth in population and modern development must be balanced with our need to protect our City’s natural open spaces and waterways. In fact, we have dedicated over a third of the land in our City to permanent open space. As our population continues to grow, must our efforts to maintain and enhance environmental health.

We have worked with our partners on major environmental engineering projects, such as this one, to protect our watershed and capture sediment and other environmental hazards before they enter Upper Newport Bay.

Another example is the Natural Treatment System, a partnership with the Irvine Company and Irvine Ranch Water District. The Natural Treatment System is modeled after a natural treatment system and provides a cost-effective, environmentally sound method for treating dry weather runoff to remove nitrogen, phosphorus and bacteria.

Ongoing collaboration between agencies is critical. We all have a vested interest in preserving the long-term health and safety of our regional watershed and our common interests go beyond municipal boundaries.

Our proactive approach to water treatment mitigates urban runoff and excess water flow and significantly reduces the amount of trash, debris, and many other pollutants entering into our storm drain systems and Newport Bay.

This is how we protect our home, not just for ourselves, but for future generations.

Thank you.”