Irvine Must Declare Its Unequivocal Condemnation of the Murder of George Floyd. We Must Also Commit to Immediate, Practical Changes to Our Own Use of Force Policies

The Irvine City Council will be considering at our next meeting on Tues., June 9, a proposed “Resolution Assuring Our Community that the City of Irvine Will Not and Does Not Tolerate the Violent Treatment of Others and the Disregard of the Sanctity of Human Life” in response to the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police, as well as the protests taking place across the nation, including Irvine.

I strongly agree that the City of Irvine must go on the record officially declaring its unequivocal condemnation of the killing of George Floyd, casually and callously murdered by police officers on an American street in full public view and with an attitude of absolute impunity.

But a resolution alone is a woefully insufficient response to the killing of George Floyd and to the widespread and justified outrage across our nation.

This murder was no isolated incident. George Floyd was another person of color killed by excessive police force in a horrible history of victims of widespread and systemic racism that has plagued us since 1619.

As municipal officials, it is incumbent upon us not only to speak against this murder and the racism underlying it, but even more importantly, to make concrete, substantive changes to our use of force policies and procedures to assure a safer and more just future for our whole community.

As currently written, the proposed resolution fails to specifically acknowledge the profound pain and anguish in our nation and in our own community caused by the death of George Floyd and the racism and injustice his death has exposed; it fails to acknowledge the systemic racism and implicit bias and discrimination against people of color that has plagued our law enforcement practices; it does not acknowledge the justice of the cause of the rightfully outraged peaceful protesters, including thousands of Irvine residents; and it does not make any practical changes to the use of force policies for law enforcement in our own City

There is much that we can and should do as elected leaders in Irvine rather than simply state platitudes while taking no concrete action. Irvine needs to seize this moment and make real institutional changes to our use of force policies and procedures in support of justice and real equality.

Our neighboring City of Tustin has done much better.

Accordingly, I will move to amend the currently proposed resolution, using the Tustin proclamation as our guide.

Specifically, I will move that we add the following language taken from the Tustin proclamation: “the City Council supports peaceful protests in [Irvine] that can serve as a critical tool for public awareness; “the City also intends to engage the community to promote open dialogues about intolerance of racism, implicit bias, and discrimination,” and that Irvine “proclaim its solidarity with those who protest peacefully against injustice, racism and hate.”

Additionally, I move to immediately adopt the following eight common sense “use of force” policies that have been identified by experts as having the greatest impact on reducing the excessive use of force by law enforcement and ending the mistreatment of people of color:

  • Prohibit the use of choke and strangle holds.
  • Require officers to exhaust all other reasonable means before resorting to deadly force.
  • Require officers to de-escalate situations, where possible, by communicating with subjects, maintaining distance, and otherwise eliminating the need to use force.
  • Develop a “force continuum” that limits the types of force and/or weapons that can be used to respond to specific types of resistance.
  • Require officers to intervene and stop excessive force used by other officers and report these incidents immediately to a supervisor.
  • Prohibit officers from shooting at moving vehicles.
  • Require officers to give a verbal warning before shooting at a civilian.
  • Require comprehensive reporting that includes uses of force and threats of force.

My call for these changes does not mean or imply criticism of the professionalism and dedication of our own Irvine Police Department.

I have tremendous confidence in the integrity and commitment of our police officers, and the inspirational leadership of our Chief of Police. Not only has the Irvine Police Department made Irvine America’s Safest City for 14 years in a row, Irvine was 1 of only 11 police major departments in the nation that did not use deadly force from 2016-2018.

I am glad that Irvine Police Chief Mike Hamel has publicly stated that he was personally “deeply disturbed” as a member of law enforcement by the “unjust and disgraceful” murder of George Floyd; that it “erodes the trust and confidence we work so hard to reach”; and that he demands that his officers “treat every member of the public with respect and professionalism.”

Nor does my call for these changes in our use of force policies mean or imply criticism of law enforcement officers in general. The majority of police officers in our nation are dedicated and conscientious public servants, true to their oaths to serve the public with respect and fairness.  As the daughter of a retired law enforcement officer, I know the difficulties faced by law enforcement and the sacrifices that law enforcement officers and their families make to keep our communities safe.

It is as a supporter of law enforcement and a member of a law enforcement family that I say that now is the time to end, once and for all, the murder and mistreatment of black and brown people by the police. In particular, now is the time to adopt common sense restrictions on the use of force against civilians as the best way to counteract the institutional bias and systemic racism against people of color.

No One, Especially Not the President, Should Use Racial Terms in Describing COVID-19

Tonight the City Council will be voting on a Resolution proposed by Mayor Christina Shea and Councilmember Farrah Khan “in support of Irvine’s Asian American Community.”

The Resolution states that “In the weeks since the coronavirus spread to the United States, there has been a noted increase in bias incidents targeting Asians and Asian Americans.”  It notes that there have been at least two such incidents in Irvine.

But the Resolution makes no mention of President Trump’s repeated use of the term “Chinese virus” as a cause or incitement of these acts of hatred.

I first raised the issue of the COVID-19 outbreak and incidents of discrimination, harassment, and bullying of people thought to be Chinese at the Irvine City Council meeting on more than a month ago, on March 10.

I asked whether we needed to do more to educate the public about how racism and xenophobia will hurt us in this crisis, and that we are all in this together.

At the time, I was told that we had no reports of any such incidents in Irvine.

Nevertheless, I continued to be concerned, especially as reports increased of a surge in racially charged attacks unfairly directing blame for the pandemic on Asians and Asian Americans, while President Trump insisted on using the phrase “Chinese virus” when speaking of COVID-19.

As a public official in a city with a significant Asian American population, I was appalled by President Trump’s continued stoking of anti-Chinese and anti-Asian bigotry.

While the memo accompanying the Resolution states that “there is no common characteristic with the disease and human ancestry. It doesn’t have a race, nationality, or political ideology” and condemns the “acts of hatred” that have been directed toward Asians and Asian Americans as a result of falsely associating them with COVID-19, it does not even mention the racial language that President Trump has insisted on using to describe the virus.

I will gladly vote in favor of condemning bigotry and acts of hate against Asians and Asian Americans.

I would like it say that it is not acceptable for anyone —  especially not the President of the United States — to use the racial term “Chinese virus” when describing this deadly pandemic.

California Governor Orders Everyone to Stay Home Except as Needed for Essential Services

This evening, the California State Public Health Officer and Director of the California Department of Public Health is ordering all individuals living in the State of California to stay home or at their place of residence except as needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors.

Read the full Executive Order here.

How long will we stay home?
This goes into effect on Thursday, March 19, 2020. The order is in place until further notice.

What can I do? What’s open?
Essential services will remain open such as:

Gas stations
Pharmacies
Food: Grocery stores, farmers markets, food banks, convenience stores, take-out and delivery restaurants
Banks
Laundromats/laundry services
Essential state and local government functions will also remain open, including law enforcement and offices that provide government programs and services.

What’s closed?
Dine-in restaurants
Bars and nightclubs
Entertainment venues
Gyms and fitness studios
Public events and gatherings
Convention Centers

\Where does this apply?
This is in effect throughout the State of California.

For a complete list of measures in effect in the City of Irvine and for regular updates on this rapidly evolving situation, visit cityofirvine.org.  See also:

Irvine Proclamation of Emergency for City of Irvine COVID-19

Irvine Coronavirus Emergency Measures

Please also see my earlier posts related to COVID-19:

California Extends Tax Deadline to July 15, 2020, for Payments Due of Up to $10 Million for Corporations and $1 Million for Individuals

City of Irvine Leaders Close City Hall, Proclaim Local Emergency in Response to COVID-19

New Statement of the Orange County Health Officer Re COVID-19 (March 17, 2020)

California State Tax Deadline Extended to June 15 Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

Irvine Schools Providing Lunches for Students During COVID-19 Closure

Irvine City Council Issues Response to Coronavirus Outbreak

California Financial Support for Employers and Employees Affected by the Coronavirus

We’re All in this Together. The Coronavirus Doesn’t Discriminate. Neither Should We.

Consult these additional resources for up-to-date information.

Irvine Community Centers Closed to the Public Due to COVID-19

In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, all Irvine Community Centers are closed to the public effective Wednesday, March 18 at 5:30 p.m. 

The closures include the following Irvine facilities:

  • All Community Centers
  • Irvine Fine Arts Center
  • Irvine Child Resource Center
  • All public facilities at the Orange County Great Park including the Visitors Center, Artists Studio, and Great Park Gallery
  • William Woollett Jr. Aquatics Center and Northwood Aquatic Center

Parks remain open for passive use, and park restrooms that are not located within Community Centers will remain open to the public.

Irvine City Hall (Tomoya Shimura, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Community Centers will be staffed during this time to monitor public use of parks, playgrounds, and athletic fields in an effort to ensure our community can enjoy City park amenities in a healthy and responsible manner, now and in the future.

City officials continue to closely monitor the evolving situation regarding the novel coronavirus, taking steps to safeguard the health and well-being of residents and businesses. Following is a list of additional facility closures and services available:

City Hall: Closed to the public. Essential services are available online, by telephone, or video conference.

Irvine Police Department: Open, but community members are strongly encouraged to call or email before coming to the station.

Senior Centers: Closed. A modified Congregate Meals Program with an outside lunch pick-up is available at Lakeview Senior Center. Meals on Wheels continues to provide meals to registered participants. Social services are available by phone.

Irvine Animal Care Center: Open by appointment only.

Sweet Shade Ability Center: Closed.

For a complete list of measures in effect and for regular updates on this rapidly evolving situation, visit cityofirvine.org.

See also:

Irvine Proclamation of Emergency for City of Irvine COVID-19

Irvine Coronavirus Emergency Measures

Please also see my earlier posts related to COVID-19:

Orange County’s Amended Order Re COVID-19 (March 18, 2020)

City of Irvine Leaders Close City Hall, Proclaim Local Emergency in Response to COVID-19

New Statement of the Orange County Health Officer Re COVID-19 (March 17, 2020)

California State Tax Deadline Extended to June 15 Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

Irvine Schools Providing Lunches for Students During COVID-19 Closure

Irvine City Council Issues Response to Coronavirus Outbreak

California Financial Support for Employers and Employees Affected by the Coronavirus

We’re All in this Together. The Coronavirus Doesn’t Discriminate. Neither Should We.

Consult these additional resources for up-to-date information.

City of Irvine Leaders Close City Hall, Proclaim Local Emergency in Response to COVID-19

IRVINE, Calif. (March 17, 2020): Today, City of Irvine officials issued a proclamation declaring a local emergency, announced the closure of City Hall, and took additional steps to protect the public and prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

“We want our community to know that the City is taking every step necessary to safeguard the health and well-being of our residents and businesses,” stated Irvine Mayor Christina Shea. “The City of Irvine is an innovative and diverse community. We ask that you follow the State and Federal guidelines. Even though they are not mandated, we encourage you to exercise them to the best of your ability. By respecting these preventative measures, we are protecting ourselves and each other, doing our part to slow the progression of COVID-19.”

Irvine City Hall (Tomoya Shimura, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Local Emergency Proclamation: The local emergency proclamation will go into effect on Wednesday, March 18, enhancing the City’s ability to access state and federal funding for COVID-19 response.

City Hall Closure: City Hall will be closed to the public, effective Wednesday, March 18. Limited City staff will remain available to maintain essential services online, via telephone, and/or via video conference. The Irvine Police Department remains open, but the public is strongly encouraged to call or email before coming to the station.

Irvine Animal Care Center: The Irvine Animal Care Center will be open on an appointment-only basis. No drop-in services shall be available. Community members can call the Center at 949-724-7740 to make an appointment.

After School and Spring Break Programs: Given the closures of the Irvine Unified School District, Santa Ana Unified School District, and Tustin Unified School District, after school programs are and spring break programs are canceled.

These measures are in addition to actions the City Council put in place at an emergency City Council meeting on March 12. The Council closed senior centers, canceled all City-sponsored community events through the end of April, including the Great Park Balloon and Carousel, and canceled all adult recreation programs, as well as indoor and outdoor youth recreation programs through April 30.

“The changes in work and home life caused by COVID-19 are significant and evolving,” City Manager John Russo said. “These additional operational modifications have been devised with a goal of protecting all City employees and community members, while continuing to provide public service. The declaration of local emergency will not affect services provided by the Irvine Police Department, Building Inspections, and Code Enforcement. We are asking for the community’s assistance, understanding, and patience, as we navigate these unprecedented times together.”

For a complete list of measures in effect and for regular updates on this rapidly evolving situation, visit cityofirvine.org.

Proclamation of Emergency for City of Irvine COVID-19

Coronavirus Emergency Measures

Please also see my earlier posts related to COVID-19:

New Statement of the Orange County Health Officer Re COVID-19 (March 17, 2020)

California State Tax Deadline Extended to June 15 Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

Irvine Schools Providing Lunches for Students During COVID-19 Closure

Irvine City Council Issues Response to Coronavirus Outbreak

California Financial Support for Employers and Employees Affected by the Coronavirus

We’re All in this Together. The Coronavirus Doesn’t Discriminate. Neither Should We.

Consult these additional resources for up-to-date information.

Irvine Schools Providing Lunches for Students During COVID-19 Closure

Irvine Unified School District has made the following announcement regarding providing school lunches during the period of school closure due to the COVID-19 outbreak:

“During the closure of IUSD schools and facilities, IUSD will provide lunches to any IUSD student, who needs them Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the following locations:

Cadence Park School
Cypress Village ES
Northwood ES
Venado MS
Oak Creek ES
Southlake MS
Culverdale ES
University Park ES

Service will be provided March 16 – March 27 at no cost in the parking lots of these schools, using a “drive thru” system to support social distancing and safety. Walk-ups welcome.

For families that cannot visit these school sites or need support over the spring break, email info@iusd.org and we will connect you with our community partners.”

Please also see my earlier posts:

Irvine City Council Issues Response to Coronavirus Outbreak

California Financial Support for Employers and Employees Affected by the Coronavirus

We’re All in this Together. The Coronavirus Doesn’t Discriminate. Neither Should We.

Consult these additional resources for up-to-date information.

Irvine City Council Issues Response to Coronavirus Outbreak

Newsletter.header.01

At tonight’s emergency Irvine City Council meeting, the council unanimously issued the following Declaration:

IRVINE CITY COUNCIL DIRECTION ON NOVEL CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

In closed session, the City Council deliberated at length concerning the effects of the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) on the City’s Public Facilities and Services. Based on those careful deliberations, the City Council unanimously directed implementation of the following items:

1. City Sponsored Events: All City-sponsored community events through the end of April will be postponed. The Community Services department will make a list of those events available online. This will include the Great Park Balloon, Carousel, and the Farmers’ Market.

2. Senior Centers: The City’s three senior centers and the Sweet Shade center will be closed until further notice, effective 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. Food delivery and pickup services and the TRIPS program will remain in operation.

3. Adult Recreation: All recreation classes for adults will be postponed through the end of April.

4. Evening and Weekend Youth Recreation: Indoor and outdoor recreation programs for children, other than after school and spring break programs, will be postponed through the end of April.

5. After School and Spring Break Recreation, and Child Care: The City Manager will work with the School District Liason Committee (CM Kuo and CM Khan) in coordination with the School Districts to determine the best course for handling after-school spring break, and child care programs for youth.

6.  Private Events at City Facilities: Private events scheduled at indoor and outdoor City facilities (such as weddings, memorials, church services and sports leagues) will be postponed. However, the Community Centers shall remain open.

7. Animal Care Center: The Animal Care Center shall remain open; however, all events at the Animal Care Center shall be postponed until further notice.

8. City Council and Commission Meetings: The City Council strongly encourages telecommuting by the public at City Council meetings, as authorized by the Governor’s emergency executive order, issued earlier today.  City staff will work with Commissions to limit and consolidate meetings, in an effort to minimize public exposures. Committee meetings will be postponed until further notice.

9. Public Facility Cleaning: The City will complete a “spring cleaning” and sanitizing of all City buildings, starting this weekend. All people in City Hall will be encouraged to continue using hand sanitizers other cleaning materials made available in City Hall.

10. Public Services: Starting next Wednesday, all services that can be performed by City staff online, by telephone or without a personal meeting will not be available at City Hall until further notice.

11. Work Travel: Work travel shall be postponed/cancelled until further notice unless essential to a City employees’ ability to maintain a license or certification.

12. City Staff Meetings: All in-person meetings shall be rescheduled as telephonic meetings, effective immediately.

Further updates and information will be available on the City’s website.

I can be reached at mefox@cityofirvine.org

Please note that the Irvine City Council does not make decisions regarding school closings.  Questions regarding Irvine’s schools should be directed to the Irvine Unified School District or the Tustin Unified School District as appropriate.

UPDATE: (1:00 p.m., March 13, 2020): We have just received news that Irvine Unified School District will be closing its schools as of Monday, March 15, until Monday, April 6. I am unaware of a similar decision by Tustin Unified School District.

UPDATE: (2:00 p.m., March 13, 2020) Tustin Unified School District has announced that since its schools are already scheduled to be closed for Spring Break as of Monday, March 15, until Monday, March 23, the District will use that time to assess when and whether to reopen. See the video announcement HERE.

Please also see my earlier posts:

California Financial Support for Employers and Employees Affected by the Coronavirus

We’re All in this Together. The Coronavirus Doesn’t Discriminate. Neither Should We.

Consult these additional resources for up-to-date information.

We’re All in this Together. The Coronavirus Doesn’t Discriminate. Neither Should We.

At last night’s Irvine City Council meeting, I raised the issue of the coronavirus outbreak and incidents of discrimination, harassment, and bullying of people thought to be Chinese.  I wondered whether we needed to do more to educate the public about how racism and xenophobia will hurt us in this crisis, and that we are all in this together.

In response, our Police Chief stated that his department had no received reports of any such incidents in Irvine.

I am one hundred percent confident that Chief Hamel truthfully answered my question.  However, I am not as certain that such incidents are not, in fact, occurring, but have not been reported to our local authorities.

Therefore, I want to encourage residents who have experienced discrimination, harassment, and bullying due to their perceived race, ethnicity, or national origin, to let me know.  I will pass this information on to the proper officials and we will take appropriate actions.

I also want to assure Irvine residents that our Irvine Police Department and our City are committed to ensuring that every resident or visitor to Irvine feels welcome and respected, especially in this difficult time.

As Chief Hamel has written, “One of the best things about Irvine is that we are dynamic and diverse. We are made up of people from cultures and countries all over the world, but this also means that various community groups may have specific and unique needs. We are here to do all we can to help address your needs. It doesn’t matter where you come from, your lifestyle, what language you speak or what religion you practice, we are your police department and we are here for you.”

The number for the Irvine Police Department is 949-724-7000.  In an emergency, call 911.

I can be reached at mefox@cityofirvine.org.

 

 

Irvine Police Use Drone to Catch Burglary Suspect on Christmas Eve

Last year, I joined three of my colleagues on the Irvine City Council to approve establishing an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) by the Irvine Police Department. The UAS program provides aerial video of active crime scenes, traffic collisions, and natural disasters.

On Tuesday night, December 24, 2019, the Irvine Police Department employed the drone to locate and arrest a commercial burglary suspect at a construction site in the 2900 block of Warner Avenue around 10:20 PM.

Following reports of a burglary in progress, police units arriving on the scene located a self-storage facility under construction and learned that a suspect was inside.

Officers then established a perimeter around the site and made announcements ordering the suspect to surrender.

The suspect hunkered down and was eventually located after police employed a number of resources including a small unmanned aircraft system, commonly referred to as a drone, along with a police helicopter and K-9 to search for the suspect.

A male suspect was located and arrested without incident.

Firefighter paramedics evaluated the man on scene before officers transported him from the location.

No other suspects were believed to be outstanding but officers were nonetheless conducting a protective sweep of the site.

Great work, IPD!

In October 2019, the FBI for the 14th year in a row, named Irvine as America’s Safest City among cities with a population of 250,000 or more.

You can watch a video of the incident from ONSCENE TV here:

Irvine Police Department Holding Two Educational Community Meetings on Gun Violence Restraining Orders

I am very pleased to announce that the Irvine Police Department is holding two educational community meetings on Gun Violence Restraining Orders.

A Gun Violence Restraining Order (GVRO) prohibits a person who is a danger to themselves or others from owning, possessing, or receiving any firearms, ammunition, or magazines.

You can read my previous posts on the need for educational outreach about GVROs and California’s Red Flag Law HERE and HERE.

Gun Violence Restraining Order Can Save Lives

A recent study by the U.C. Davis School of Medicine found that California’s red flag law has significantly reduced gun violence.

According to Laura Cutilletta, legal director of the Giffords Law Center, California’s red flag law acts as a sort of timeout, so someone in psychological distress can get counseling while their fitness to possess a gun is evaluated.  “It’s a way to allow for temporary removal of firearms in a situation just like this: where somebody has made threats, where they have been expelled from school because of those threats, they’re in counseling, and parents or the school or whoever it is understands that this person poses a threat,” she explained.

However, the effectiveness of Gun Violence Restraining Orders has been limited by the lack of awareness of the law on the part of both the public and the police.  Too often, neither the public nor the local police are aware of or encouraged to obtain Gun Violence Restraining Orders.

That’s why it is so important that our police department has made these educational workshops on GVROs available to the public.

Learn more about Gun Violence Restraining Orders by attending one of the two community meetings presented by members of the Irvine Police Department.

Two community meetings are scheduled:

Wednesday, October 30, 2019, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Irvine City Hall, 1 Civic Center Plaza, Irvine 92606

Tuesday, November 5, 2019, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Portola Springs Community Center, 900 Tomato Springs, Irvine 92618

You can see the Facebook event page for the October community meeting HERE.

Thank you Chief Mike Hamel and the Irvine Police Department for holding these important educational community meetings.

See you there!

 

Tell the Irvine City Council to Agendize the Proposal to Educate Residents and Law Enforcement about California’s Red Flag Law and Gun Violence Restraining Orders

California has a “red flag law” that allows family members or police to seek a court order to temporarily remove guns from mentally unstable people, but too few are aware of it. I have asked the mayor to place my proposal that Irvine educate our residents and police about California’s red flag law and its appropriate use on the City Council agenda. 

Here is the memo that I sent to the mayor:

“​Re: Reducing Gun Violence and California’s Red Flag Law

After the May 2014 mass shooting in Isla Vista in which a mentally unstable young man killed six people and injured fourteen others before killing himself, California passed a ‘red flag law’ that empowers family members and law enforcement officers to petition a court to obtain a “Gun Violence Restraining Order” (GVRO) to temporarily limit a person’s access to guns if they are an immediate and present danger of harming themselves or others.

Red flags laws have now been passed in 17 states and several more states are considering such laws. Red flag laws have been supported by both Republicans and Democrats. In the aftermath of the recent mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, President Trump declared that ‘We must make sure that those judged to pose a grave risk to public safety do not have access to firearms and that if they do, those firearms can be taken through rapid due process. . . That is why I have called for red flag laws, also known as extreme risk protection orders.’

Red flag laws are not just meant to prevent mass shootings. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Nearly two-thirds of the gun deaths in the United States — over 22,000 per year — are suicides. Eighty-three percent of suicide attempts by gun succeed; suicide attempts by other means are fatal only 5% of the time. A GRVO can save lives by temporarily preventing a loved one from accessing the most lethal form of suicide until the crisis passes, giving them a chance to get the help they need.

But for red flag laws to be effective, it is important that members of the public and local police officers are aware of the law and encouraged to obtain Gun Violence Restraining Orders when appropriate. Unfortunately, awareness of our red flag law is not nearly as widespread as it should be.

​I am proposing that the Irvine City Council work with City Staff and the Irvine Police Department to devise and implement a public awareness program regarding California’s red flag law, hold training sessions on the red flag law for members of the Irvine Police Department, and direct our law enforcement officers to use GVRO’s when appropriate.

I am requesting that this item be placed on the agenda for the Irvine City Council.”

Due to the City Council’s new restrictive agenda policy, which prohibits an item from being placed on the agenda unless the mayor or two city council members agree to do so, I can not place this item on the agenda without the support of the mayor or other councilmembers.  Accordingly, I have asked Irvine Mayor Christina Shea to agree to put this proposal on the Irvine City Council agenda.

Red flag laws save lives.

A recent study by the U.C. Davis School of Medicine found that California’s red flag law has significantly reduced gun violence. According to Laura Cutilletta, legal director of the Giffords Law Center, California’s red flag law acts as a sort of timeout, so someone in psychological distress can get counseling while their fitness to possess a gun is evaluated.  “It’s a way to allow for temporary removal of firearms in a situation just like this: where somebody has made threats, where they have been expelled from school because of those threats, they’re in counseling, and parents or the school or whoever it is understands that this person poses a threat,” she explained.

OC Sheriff’s deputies in Mission Viejo successfully petitioned the court for a Gun Violence Restraining Order and temporarily removed over 22 firearms and 3,000 rounds of ammunition from the home. All the firearms were legally obtained by the suspect who was arrested for domestic violence.

However, the effectiveness of the red flag law has been limited by the lack of awareness of the law on the part of both the public and the police.  Too often, neither the public nor the local police are aware of or encouraged to obtain Gun Violence Restraining Orders.

A national organization, Speak for Safety, has formed for the specific purpose of raising awareness of the Gun Violence Restraining Order as a tool to remove firearms and ammunition from people who are an immediate danger to themselves or others.

Recently, deputies from the Orange County Sheriff’s Department  a domestic violence victim in Mission Viejo who feared for her family’s safety. Deputies petitioned the courts for a Gun Violence Restraining Order and an Emergency Protective Order. They temporarily removed over 22 firearms and 3,000 rounds of ammunition from the home. All the firearms were legally obtained by the suspect who was arrested for domestic violence.

But too often, neither family members nor law enforcement personnel know that such a gun violence prevention tool exists, even in states, like California, that have very effective GVRO laws on the books.

This the reason I have proposed  that the Irvine City Council work with City Staff and the Irvine Police Department to devise and implement a public awareness and education program regarding California’s red flag law, hold training sessions on the red flag law for members of the Irvine Police Department, and direct our law enforcement officers to use GVROs whenever appropriate.

Please join me in this effort by contacting the Mayor and the Irvine City Council and urging them to support this common sense proposal to use California’s existing red flag law to prevent gun violence and save lives in Irvine.

Let’s Reduce Gun Violence By Educating the Public and Training Our Police to Use California’s “Red Flag” Law

California has some of the country’s strictest gun control laws; these laws are likely the reason that California has one of the lowest overall gun deaths per capita in the nation.

Yet, as the recent mass shooting in Gilroy shows, our state laws are not enough, by themselves, to prevent our residents from becoming victims of gun violence. In order to better protect our residents in California from gun violence, two more crucial steps need to be taken.

One of these steps — and by far the most important — is that Federal gun regulations must catch-up to California’s. 

The assault rifle used in the mass shooting in Gilroy is banned in California, but it is legal in our neighboring state of Nevada, where it was legally bought by the killer three weeks before the shooting.

The killer also had several high capacity magazines for the weapon, which are also illegal in California, but not in Nevada where they were bought.

Until the federal government finds the courage to defy the NRA and the gun dealer lobby, it will be very difficult to prevent these weapons of war from other states from being brought into and used in California.

For this reason, national action on gun violence should be advocated by everyone in California who cares about reducing gun violence.  Politicians who support the current president’s policy of giving veto power over federal gun regulations to the gun dealer lobby are undermining the effectiveness of California’s gun laws. For California to be safe, assault rifles and large capacity magazines must be outlawed in all of the states.

But another important step can be taken now, by us, even at the local level. That step is to inform and educate the public — and train our police officers — on the effective use of California’s gun regulations that are already on the books.

Perhaps the most important of these gun regulations is California’s “red flag” law, which empowers family members and law enforcement officers to petition courts to obtain a “Gun Violence Restraining Order” (GVRO) to temporarily limit a person’s access to guns if they are an “immediate and present danger” of harming themselves or others.

In 2014, California became the first state to let family members ask a judge to remove firearms from a relative who appears to pose a threat.  The “Gun Violence Restraining Order” law (California Penal Code Section 18100 et sec), modeled after domestic violence restraining orders, allows police or family members to obtain a judge’s order to disarm a gun owner they fear will turn violent. The order requires the gun owner to surrender all firearms for 21 days, and can be extended to a full year after a hearing.

The California legislature took action after a mentally ill man killed six students and wounded 13 others near the University of California, Santa Barbara, before killing himself. Authorities were legally unable to confiscate the weapons of the killer, despite his family’s having expressed concerns to authorities that he would become violent.

California’s law also empowers police to petition for the protective orders, which can require authorities to remove firearms for up to one year. Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have since adopted similar laws.

Red flag laws save lives.

A recent study by the U.C. Davis School of Medicine found that California’s red flag law has significantly reduced gun violence.

According to Laura Cutilletta, legal director of the Giffords Law Center, California’s red flag law acts as a sort of timeout, so someone in psychological distress can get counseling while their fitness to possess a gun is evaluated.  “It’s a way to allow for temporary removal of firearms in a situation just like this: where somebody has made threats, where they have been expelled from school because of those threats, they’re in counseling, and parents or the school or whoever it is understands that this person poses a threat,” she explained.

However, the effectiveness of the red flag law has been limited by the lack of awareness of the law on the part of both the public and the police.  Too often, neither the public nor the local police are aware of or encouraged to obtain Gun Violence Restraining Orders.

A national organization, Speak for Safety, has formed for the specific purpose of raising awareness of the Gun Violence Restraining Order as a tool to remove firearms and ammunition from people who are an immediate danger to themselves or others.

Too often, neither family members nor law enforcement personnel know that such a gun violence prevention tool exists, even in states, like California, that have very effective GVRO laws on the books.

San Diego is an exception.  Since 2017, San Diego County has issued more than 300 orders, more than any other county in the state. They have been used to intervene in escalating cases of domestic violence, to prevent potential suicides, and with people with potentially dangerous mental illness. In the end, the police have seized more than 400 weapons and nearly 80,000 rounds of ammunition. As San Diego City Attorney Mara Elliott has stated, ““We have no problem with responsible people having guns,” she said. “Our concern are the people who are no longer responsible. That’s when we’ll step in.”

Student march on Harvard Avenue in Irvine for stricter gun control. Photo: Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG).

The San Diego City Attorney’s office has been given a grant by the State of California to provide this training.  According to the San Diego City Attorney’s office, “Using case studies, we explain ways to apply the law, describe the process for obtaining a GVRO, and address complex issues concerning domestic violence, juveniles and individuals with neurological disorders, including dementia and Alzheimer’s. We also devote a significant amount of time to the topics of service, search warrants and seizure (firearms). The curriculum is directed at those responsible for implementing and coordinating a GVRO program at their agencies. Typically, all forms of law enforcement and city attorneys, with law enforcement clients, would directly benefit from this event. We have received nothing but positive feedback, increased interest and requests for more training from the law enforcement agencies and city attorneys we have worked with so far.”

You can see San Diego’s slide presentation about California’s red flag law here.

I believe that Irvine should also be a leader in utilizing the common sense gun control regulations that are already on the books.

Therefore, I will propose that the Irvine City Council work with City Staff and the Irvine Police Department to devise and implement a public awareness and education program regarding California’s red flag law, hold training sessions on the red flag law for members of the Irvine Police Department, and direct our law enforcement officers to use GVROs whenever appropriate.  We should contact both the San Diego City Attorney’s Office and the State of California about providing us with assistance with red flag training, procedures, and protocols.

Please join me in this effort by contacting the Mayor and the Irvine City Council and urging them to support this common sense proposal to use California’s existing red flag law to prevent gun violence and save lives in Irvine.

Everyone who knows someone who may be at risk of hurting themselves or others with a gun, should know how to “Speak for Safety” with a GVRO.

Sign our petition for common sense gun regulation here.

 

 

Yes, Let’s Create a Gun Violence Task Force — And Let’s Also Have a Real Discussion about How to Prevent Mass Shootings and Gun Violence

Based on her recent social media post, it appears that in the wake of three recent mass shootings (in Gilroy, California, El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio) leaving at least 45 people dead and many dozens more injured, Irvine Mayor Christina Shea intends to create a task force to discuss what we can do in Irvine to prevent gun violence.

Significantly, Mayor Shea asks that we not turn this discussion into a “partisan” issue, and that we not hold local, state, or national politicians responsible for their actions, or lack of action, leading to the proliferation of mass shootings and gun violence.

I fully support a discussion of how our City Council can help prevent Irvine from becoming the site of the next gun violence atrocity. This discussion is long overdue. Our nation is suffering from a gun violence emergency.

But the discussion must not be a sham, and not be muzzled from the very beginning by preventing mention of the fact that Republican politicians — at every level of government — have sided with gun dealers and the NRA over the safety of our communities and families, and have stubbornly blocked Congress from enacting meaningful, common sense federal gun regulation.

We must also be willing to acknowledge the fact that President Donald Trump has incited violence and manipulated racial hatred in ways that many of us had hoped belonged to our tragic past. And we must explicitly reject and condemn Trump’s racist rhetoric.

As President Obama recently said, as elected officials and community leaders, we must reject the rhetoric of those “who demonize those who don’t look like us, or suggest that other people, including immigrants, threaten our way of life, or refer to other people as sub-human, or imply that America belongs to just one certain type of people.” Such language “has no place in our politics and our public life” and it is time “for the overwhelming majority of Americans of goodwill, of every race and faith and political party, to say as much — clearly and unequivocally.”

Let’s have a real discussion of mass shootings and gun violence — without any attempts at mirco-management by the Mayor or self-serving limitations on that discussion being imposed in advance by local politicians who are afraid that the public is fed up with the Republican Party’s spinelessness in the face of the NRA and the racist rhetoric of Trumpism, and their policy of creating diversions after each mass shooting rather than enacting real, common sense, gun control regulation.

I also ask that this Task Force be comprised of and led by real experts in the field of gun violence prevention. We have many such experts here in Irvine on the faculty of UCI and the UCI School of Law.  Our task force should not be solely composed of — or led by — politicians with an interest in self-promotion or self-protection, or protecting their political allies from justified and necessary criticism.

In addition, I suggest that the Irvine City Council immediately direct our Irvine Police Department to promote awareness of California’s Gun Violence Restraining Order (GVRO) law, which allows family members and law enforcement to seek the temporary removal of firearms from someone they believe poses a danger to themselves or others.

While GVROs have been called “the best tool in the state of California for responding to a threat of gun violence,” they are rarely used because residents and law enforcement remain largely unaware of the law and its potential to help stop a crime before it has been committed.

You can see a video presentation of California GVROs here:

I also propose that the City of Irvine and the Irvine Police Department remind residents about California’s safe storage laws requiring that guns be locked away from minors and anyone who should not have access to them.

I look forward to a lively, positive and open-minded discussion of what we can do in Irvine to prevent mass shootings and gun violence, including an awareness and educational campaign about GVROs, issuing official statements from our City Council calling on President Trump to stop his inflammatory rhetoric demonizing immigrants, Muslims, and people of color, and calling on Congress to pass common sense gun regulations relating to universal background checks, military-style assault rifles, and high capacity magazines.

 

Remembering Traffic Victims — and Preventing Them in Irvine

Sunday, November 18, 2018, is the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims.

This day is dedicated to remembering those killed or injured in road crashes, as well as to pay tribute to the dedicated emergency crews, police, fire and medical professionals who daily deal with the traumatic aftermath of road death and injury.

Unfortunately, this Day of Remembrance has increasing significance for the City of Irvine.

At our most recent City Council meeting, residents told us about witnessing extremely dangerous driving behavior and very close calls involving their children.

I am sure you also witnessed close calls or have heard similar frightening stories from your neighbors.

I am very concerned — as are others — that we will see an increase in serious injuries and deaths in Irvine because a motorist did not obey a stop sign, respect a pedestrian’s right of way, or pay attention.

I have set a meeting with our Chief of Police to step up traffic enforcement and to make sure that our police have every resource they need to ensure that our city is safe for children, other pedestrians, and bicycle riders.

I will be discussing numerous ways to increase pedestrian and bicyclist safety, especially for children, including stepped-up enforcement, more illumination of crosswalks, and better lighting and visibility at stop signs. Your suggestions are invited.

The truth is, we can greatly improve the safety of our streets simply by being better and more respectful drivers, and by all of us — drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians — following the rules of the road.

The most common cause of vehicular accidents is driver behavior, especially distracted driving.  In fact, distracted driving accounts for an astonishing 95 percent of all auto collisions.  According to the National Safety Council,  using a mobile phone while driving now the most prevalent cause of a traffic collisions.

Globally, road traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for people aged 15-29 and claim more than 1.25 million lives each year. In the United States, motor vehicle fatality is the leading cause of accidental death among teenagers, representing over one-third of all teenager deaths.

As I have said, Irvine is world-famous as a safe place to live and raise our families, but it won’t stay that way unless Irvine motorists make a conscious decision to reject distracted driving, obey stop signs, and respect pedestrians’ right-of-way.

It’s not just our reputation as America’s safest city that is on the line.  Our lives, and the lives of our children, are at stake.

Press Conference on Recent Anti-Semitic Vandalism in Irvine (Updated with Video)

The City of Irvine, in partnership with the Irvine Police Department and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), will hold a press conference on Friday, November 2, 2018, beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the recent anti-Semitic vandalism at Beth Jacob Synagogue in Irvine.

The press conference will be held at the Irvine Civic Center Plaza, 1 Civic Center Plaza, Irvine, CA 92606.

Among those who will speak: Mayor Wagner, Police Chief Hamel, Rabbi Yisroel Ciner, Beth Jacob Congregation, and Peter Levi, Regional Director, ADL.

City staff has also reached out to other community and faith leaders.

Irvine will always stand strong against intolerance and stand up for our neighbors. We are committed to preserving the peace in our wonderfully diverse community and keeping every resident of Irvine safe and secure.

For more information, contact Craig Reem, Director of Public Affairs and Communications, City of Irvine at 949-724-6077.

RELATED:

Irvine Police Respond Quickly to Anti-Semitic Graffiti and Other Hate Vandalism at Irvine Valley College

Irvine Will Stand Strong Against Intolerance and Stand Up for Our Neighbors

UPDATE: 

The Anti-Defamation League announced a $5,000 reward for information that leads to the arrest of the hate crime criminal or criminals.

Video of the Press Conference: 

 

 

 

Irvine Police Respond Quickly to Anti-Semitic Graffiti and Other Hate Vandalism at Irvine Valley College

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Two days ago I learned that restrooms at Irvine Valley College had recently been defaced with anti-Semitic graffiti (swastikas).

I immediately relayed this information to Irvine Police Chief Mike Hamel.

Irvine Police Chief Mike Hamel

Chief Hamel assured me that the Irvine Police Department would investigate and get back to me ASAP.

Here is the email about the incident that the Irvine Police Department sent today to the Mayor and the City Council:

Mayor and City Council,

Recently, the Irvine Police Department became aware of an incident at Irvine Valley College (IVC) in which anti-Jewish sentiments were the subject of graffiti on campus. Additionally, there was an incident in which fliers for a Muslim group were defaced.

The Irvine Police Department is working closely with IVC campus police and administration to investigate these incidents. To address concerns on campus related to these incidents, IVC will release the following statement from Chief Hamel today.

The statement will be distributed to students, faculty and staff.

There have been no media inquiries related to this incident.

The Irvine Police Department has been made aware of recent incidents of graffiti vandalism on campus, as well as the defacing of college club fliers. IPD is working closely with the Irvine Valley College Police Department to thoroughly investigate these incidents. The Irvine Police Department has long supported IVC campus police in the goal of providing a safe campus for staff, students and visitors. As partners in law enforcement, IPD provides additional resources in support of campus police whenever we are called upon, including these recent incidents. 

The Irvine Police Department stands with President Roquemore, the Irvine Valley College Administration, Chief Meyer and IVC campus police in condemning any acts of vandalism or defacement on campus, especially those that may appear to be directed at specific groups.  We recognize that Irvine Valley College is committed to providing an academic and work environment that respects the dignity of all individuals in the spirit of a diverse, vibrant and all-inclusive campus community.

I am committed to continuing IPD’s close collaboration with IVC campus police to maintain the highest levels of safety on campus. Remember that we rely on you, the members of the IVC community, to be our eyes and ears on campus. If you see something suspicious, please immediately report it to campus police at 949-451-5234. You can also call the Irvine Police Department at 949-724-7000. In an emergency, always dial 9-1-1.

 The Irvine Police Department and IVC campus police will provide updates on these incidents in the event of any new developments that we are able to share. If you have further concerns about this case and wish to communicate with IPD directly, please contact Operations Commander Noelle Smiley at 949-724-7025 or nsmiley@cityofirvine.org

Please rest assured that while these recent incidents are disturbing, we are not aware of any imminent danger to the IVC community or the City as a result of this activity.

Yours in partnership,

 Chief Mike Hamel

Irvine Police Department

Contact:

Kim Mohr, Communications Manager, Irvine Police Department

949-724-7112 (o) 949-299-6887 (c) | 1 Civic Center Plaza, Irvine, CA 92606 | kmohr@cityofirvine.org

Thank you, Chief Hamel and the Irvine Police Department, for your swift response and commitment to keeping all of Irvine safe.

RELATED:

Irvine Will Stand Strong against Intolerance and Stand Up for Our Neighbors

Meet Your Irvine Police Officers at Coffee with a Cop!

Join Irvine Police Department personnel on Thursday, November 8, 2018, for a cup of coffee at Starbucks in the Los Olivos Marketplace.

Our Police Department not only keeps us the Safest City in America, it also helps to keep us among most welcoming to diversity.

As our Police Chief Mike Hamel has said, “One of the best things about Irvine is that we are dynamic and diverse. We are made up of people from cultures and countries all over the world, but this also means that various community groups may have specific and unique needs. We are here to do all we can to help address your needs.  It doesn’t matter where you come from, your lifestyle, what language you speak or what religion you practice, we are your police department and we are here for you.”

“Coffee with a Cop!” is a chance to meet our Irvine police officers and get your public safety questions answered in a relaxed environment.

Kids are welcome! Stop by any time between 7:30 a.m. and 9:00 a.m.

WHAT: Coffee with a Cop!

WHERE: Starbucks in the Los Olivos Marketplace, 8539 Irvine Center Drive, Irvine, California 92618.

WHEN: Thursday, November 8, 2018, 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.  Join us at any time during this two-hour event.

WHO: This is a kid and family-friendly event. All ages are welcome!

COST: Free.

See the “Coffee with a Cop?” Facebook event page here.